Can We Trust Sony With The Release Of A “PS4K”?

ps4_fw19.1920

According to a new eurogamer.net confirmation, an independent source is now confirming what Kotaku reported a couple of weeks ago regarding a PS4.5 as they called it. Some new details have arrived regarding the possible specifics of the console as well as the timeline of when we could expect to see some technological improvements. Let’s look at what we have found out and what we might can expect from a expected PS4K launch in 2017.

Technology shifted drastically from 2005-2011. Transistor sizes were cut in half, GPU and CPU power was buffed significantly, and UHD started to see some of the light of day as a future possibility. Sony and Microsoft both created consoles based on the projections that this would have been the most significant jump in technological advancement for many years to come, and in many ways they were right. The drastic resizing of transistor chips has slowed dramatically up until this point stopping at a mere 28nm in size. One of the main driving forces behind what many are now calling the PS4K is the new 14/16nm. Two benefits come from shrinking transistors that will benefit gamers. They will decrease the size needed to operate which will create smaller devices, and they will increase the amount of transistors which can be placed in a console for more computing power.

While these technological advances are exciting, they come with challenges all their own. One of the key concerns for gamers and the gaming industry at the moment is whether or not a move to a niche 4K gaming community would drive players away from the affordable PS4 they already have in their living room because new games would be incompatible. While this would be unfortunate, a significant bump to the 4K gaming experience might be worth it. The problem is, however, that a decrease to the transistor size simply isn’t enough on its own to merit the ability to compute with that much power. Three major technological advances paved the way to the current generation of consoles from the old, and new transistor sizes would only be considered a strong component of a bigger picture required to move forward again. So is the time right for Sony to move forward with a 4K option? It would depend on one’s reasoning for getting into the 4K/UHD market.

As it stands now, without a major upgrade to the CPU and GPU capabilities of the PS4 and an increase to the speed of the RAM (not the size), playing AAA games on the PS4K would not be possible. This does not mean that over the next year a viable option for powering such a device is not possible, but at this point has yet to be revealed. eurogamer.net in their article outline some interesting possibilities regarding advances from a Polaris with twice the GPU support, but it might not be released for the console soon enough for the release of the PS4K.

There are still many questions that have yet to be answered regarding a mid generation upgrade to the PS4, but as of now the picture is beginning to become a bit more clear. Keep your eye to ThisGenGaming.com for the newest information regarding confirmation from Sony, possibly release dates. So far it seems that the release of the PS4K is all but confirmed, what will be included at release and what compatibility issues might exist at release, however, is yet to be seen. My best guess from the information we have is that we will get the ability to stream 4K video through services like Netflix with the possibility of Blu Ray in 4K, but not likely.

Les Hughes on sabtwitter
Les Hughes
Les is the Husband and father of 2 (soon to be three). He has been playing games since childhood, getting his start with “Blades of Steel” and graduating through every system since then. He often fills his time hosting events for Dads Gaming where he is one of their community managers (dadsgaming.com). While he can often be found playing most FPS, he’s not afraid to jump into a good ole fashion RPG. Les has been writing professionally for four years after earning his masters degree is 2012. Any questions for him can be directed towards @LesGetGaming on twitter, /r/lghughes3 on reddit, or lesgetgaming@gmail.com.
About the author

Les Hughes

Les is the Husband and father of 2 (soon to be three). He has been playing games since childhood, getting his start with “Blades of Steel” and graduating through every system since then. He often fills his time hosting events for Dads Gaming where he is one of their community managers (dadsgaming.com). While he can often be found playing most FPS, he’s not afraid to jump into a good ole fashion RPG. Les has been writing professionally for four years after earning his masters degree is 2012. Any questions for him can be directed towards @LesGetGaming on twitter, /r/lghughes3 on reddit, or lesgetgaming@gmail.com.
  • DarthDiggler

    Pointless article. Headline was click bait, EuroGamer provided far more details and reasonable speculations.

    One of the key concerns for gamers and the gaming industry at the moment is whether or not a move to a niche 4K gaming community would drive players away from the affordable PS4 they already have in their living room because new games would be incompatible.

    The whole point to the PS4.5 or PS4K would be to be 100% compatible with the PS4. Given that PS4 and likely any console after it will offer x86 compatibility, forward and backward compatibility really shouldn’t be a big issue.